SPOT Saves

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4,000 RESCUES AND COUNTING THOUSANDS OF RESCUES MADE. COUNTLESS LIVES TOUCHED.

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Stranded adventure riders use SPOT to initiate rescue following mechanical breakdown




Team “Nova Scotia” captain Adam Cruikshank and his riding partner had just completed the first 5 routes of the Fundy Adventure Rally, a 400+ km motorcycle adventure riding event, when late in the day, along a remote section of the course, the team experienced a flat tire.

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Riding Solo with SPOT




Two years ago Laura Jones bought her first motorcycle, a Suzuki GS500, on Mother's Day. She says "on a whim" last May she decided to venture out on her first month-long solo motorcycle adventure starting with a 4-day journey that would take her from Calgary, Alberta to meet friends in Buena Vista, Colorado. For safety, and given that most of the trip was along routes that were remote where she wouldn't have access to cell phone networks, her Dad loaned her a SPOT GPS Satellite Messenger which he used frequently on their sailing & flying trips. Laura says that SPOT would also help "to keep my mom's blood pressure down from worry". In Laura's words, her mom wasn't exactly "stoked" about the solo trip, but with SPOT at least she'd have peace of mind knowing that Laura would be able to stay in touch, sending regular check-in/OK messages.

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HIKER USES SPOT DEVICE TO AID ANOTHER HIKER EXPERIENCING HEART PROBLEMS IN AUSTRALIA

Rescue Profile: Han
Case #: 15918


Snowmobilers Extracted from Avalanche Exposure
Han


While on a seven day hiking trip in Tasmania, Australia, Han Strating and his girlfriend were near New Pelion when they came across another hiker experiencing heart problems. Realizing the man was in need of serious medical attention; Han quickly pulled out his SPOT GEN3® and pressed the S.O.S. button. Luckily, there was a nurse with the individual who was already providing first aid to keep him stable while they waited for help.

Since the SPOT GEN3 belonged to Han, GEOS, reached out to his mother who happened to be his primary point of contact. Han’s mother, who happened to be on the other side of the world and with no prior knowledge of his whereabouts, became very wary upon receiving the call from GEOS. Han says that his mom was “stressed for a few hours, but ultimately was happy and proud of what I did…” Within 2 ½ hours from when Han pressed the S.O.S button on his SPOT device to aid the fellow hiker, the Westpac Rescue helicopter arrived at their location to take the patient and his wife to Hobart Hospital. As soon as the helicopter took off, Han began notifying his friends and emergency contacts that he was indeed okay and not in danger.

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Iqaluit Hunter Rescued after Snowmobile Breaks Down on the Ice in -40° Celsius

Rescue Profile: Adam Noah
Case #: 16195


Iqaluit Hunter Rescued


Early in the morning of March 10th, 2016, Adam Noah, a hunter from Baker Lake, Nunavut, headed out on his snowmobile for a day of caribou hunting. By the middle of the afternoon, when he was in a remote area about 45 kilometers east of Baker Lake, his snowmobile broke down. The temperature in that area was -40° Celsius.

For the past two years Noah says he has owned a SPOT GPS Satellite Messenger, which he carries with him as part of his emergency gear whenever he goes hunting or fishing. "We don't only use a snowmobile when we go out hunting or fishing. We always have a sled attached which carries survival gear. It gets so cold that you can't just go hunting for the day without emergency gear." For Noah, SPOT is an important part of his emergency gear.

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Snowmobilers Extracted from Avalanche Exposure

Rescue Profile: Matt Oliver
Case #: 15932


Snowmobilers Extracted from Avalanche Exposure
Matt Oliver


Matt Oliver and four friends picked a beautiful day for snowmobiling in Steamboat Springs, CO. They set off on their ride around 10 AM and traveled a familiar route. A few hours into their ride, they decided to take a different path back to their vehicles. The new path led them to a creek ravine and they realized they were getting into dangerous avalanche terrain. They began strategizing the best way out.

The group of five experienced snowmobilers vacillated about driving back through their old tracks, but after determining their location via their GPS system, they decided it was safer to head down the creek for another half mile rather than driving back uphill. The thick blankets of snow made it very difficult for them to make much distance and they knew they couldn't continue on without putting themselves at a greater risk.

Luckily, Matt and his friends were well prepared with saws, thermals, boiling pots and Matt's SPOT Satellite GPS Messenger. "I pressed the S.O.S. on my SPOT to alert GEOS International Emergency Rescue Coordination Center, knowing that it would not be until morning when search and rescue could safely come help us," commented Matt. They made a fire and set up camp for the night. Meanwhile, GEOS contacted Matt's mom and dad to let them know of the situation. The family was advised that it would take some time for search and rescue to assist due to the situation of snow and avalanche danger.

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